Eternity & Time – Day 8

by ggerhauser

God’s nature is revealed by his act of creation. “In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.” This verse implies all of God’s attributes. For example, if he is before all things and creator of all things, he must be all-knowing, almighty and all-pervading. Like a father holds a baby, he cradles the heavens and the earth in his hands. Remember what Solomon testified: “Behold, heaven and the highest heaven cannot contain You” (1 Kings 8:27, NKJV). The heavens and the earth cannot contain God—rather, the creator contains them. This includes time, space and matter. And probably the most elusive of these dimensions is time itself.

Who can understand time? We cannot see it, but we do experience it. And because of its mystery, many mistakenly believe time is everlasting like God. However, time is not eternal; it does not infinitely extend both backwards and forwards. Time, as we know it, has its origins in God’s creation. It has a beginning and an ending. It is encased in God himself who declares, “I am the Alpha and the Omega, the First and the Last, the Beginning and the End” (Rev. 22:13).

In salvation we are invited into the fellowship of God himself; we are called into his eternal life (John 3:16). I think the best way to describe eternity is to call it God’s own time—an attribute of God himself. Eternity does not exist beside or outside of God: it refers to God’s own life. On the other hand, our time is created time. Moreover, it is now fallen time and consequently always slipping out of our grasp. Through salvation we participate in God’s time—his life—so that now we are able to redeem our created and fallen time. In other words, our time now becomes his time. Today, redeem the time because the days are evil (Eph. 5:16).

Prayer: “For yesterday and today and tomorrow are completely in time; however, You, though nothing can be without You, are nevertheless not in place or time but all things are in You. For nothing contains You, but You contain all things” (Anselm, Proslogion, 142-143). Thank you for bringing me into fellowship with yourself, into your eternal life. May your eternity invade my day and may you help me to redeem the time.